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Posts Tagged ‘Great Spirit’

 

Oh GREAT SPIRIT
help me always
to speak the truth quietly,
to listen with an open mind
when others speak,
and to remember the peace
that may be found in silence.

(Cherokee Prayer)

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Grandfather, Great Spirit, once more behold me on earth and lean to hear my feeble voice. You lived first, and you are older than all need, older than all prayer. All things belong to you — the two-leggeds, the four-leggeds, the wings of the air and all green things that live. You have set the powers of the four quarters to cross each other. The good road and the road of difficulties you have made to cross; and where they cross, the place is holy. Day in and day out, forever, you are the life of things.

Therefore, I am sending a voice, Great Spirit, my Grandfather, forgetting nothing you have made, the stars of the universe and the grasses of the earth.

(Black Elk, Oglala Sioux)

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Do not grieve. Misfortunes will happen to the wisest and best of men. Death will come, always out of season. It is the command of the Great Spirit, and all nations and people must obey. What is past and what cannot be prevented should not be grieved for … Misfortunes do not flourish particularly in our lives – they grow everywhere.

Big Elk – Omaha Chief

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One question that we get from time to time is “Are you really Indian?”  Robert is a direct lineal descendent of Black Elk (Chippewa). He is of Chippewa/Ojibwe and Apache heritage.  His family traces back over eleven generations to the Swan Creek/Black River Bands of Michigan, known today as the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe. The Chippewa/Ojibwe refer to themselves as “Anishinaabe” (The People).

Terri Lynn is French, Irish, English, Scottish and Welsh. She was recently told that her maternal grandmother said she was an American Indian, but because she was adopted from the orphan train and raised by another family, we know little about her. Terri wears the traditional buckskin dress during ceremonies and teachings, to honor her husband’s family. The dress belonged to her mother-in-law, Akwagiishnuquay (End Of Day Woman). When they married, she was given the command, “You are now one of us, go teach with your husband. This is the traditional way of our People.”

White Shield, An Arikara Chief said it better than we ever could:

The color of the skin makes no difference.  What is good and just for one is good and just for the other, and the Great Spirit made all men brothers. I have a red skin, but my grandfather was a white man. What does it matter?  It is not the color of the skin that makes me good or bad.

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Great Spirit — I want no blood upon my land to stain the grass. I want it all clear and pure, and I wish it so, that all who go through among my people may find it peaceful when they come, and leave peacefully when they go.

– Ten Bears, Yamparika Comanche

 

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There are several versions of Native American 10 Commandments. The following version is one of the most popular and words to live by.

  1. The Earth is our Mother; care for Her.
  2. Honor all your relations.
  3. Open your heart and soul to the Great Spirit.
  4. All life is sacred; treat all beings with respect.
  5. Take from the Earth what is needed and nothing more.
  6. Do what needs to be done for the good of all.
  7. Give constant thanks to the Great Spirit for each day.
  8. Speak the truth but only of the good in others.
  9. Follow the rhythms of Nature.
  10. Enjoy life’s journey; but leave no tracks.

Gakina-awiiya (We Are All Related),

Chief Robert and Terri Lynn TallTree
www.thetalltrees.com

“Teach us love, compassion and honor…that we may heal the Earth, and heal each other.”   – Ojibwe prayer

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