Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘2008 September’ Category

Here’s a reprint from the Native American Women’s Association newsletter – the Indican Community Newsletter.

REPRINT OF AUGUST 2008 ARTICLE ON THE TALLTREES

Robert and Terri TallTree have been married since 1995 and have lived in Colorado Springs since that time, but Robert’s ties to this area date back to 1978 when he originally moved here.  Before they married, Terri had made her own mark on the corporate world developing innovative training programs in a variety of fields. After their marriage, together they began a budding culturally based educational business that now keeps them on the road most of the year. 

 

 

At first, Terri was basically in the background during these programs, but that all changed when Robert developed laryngitis during a scheduled program and Terri had to take over for the day.  Since then they have done the programs together, with much success in a business that continues to grow yearly and is now international.  Before marriage, Terri had been traditionally trained in Lakota philosophy and ceremony and permitted by the elders to use what she learned to teach others in her career field.  

 

 

They have presented their programs in such places as Morocco, Spain, England, Gibraltar, Canada, and across the USA.  They also do dozens of presentations at American Indian schools each year, as well as many other places.  One year, they spoke to more than 200,000 school children in Wisconsin and Colorado alone.  Their programs now include lectures, workshops, concerts and plenty of culturally relevant subjects and motivational material. 

 

 

Robert’s involvement in this area includes owning a shop in Manitou Springs from 1980 to 1994 where he created and sold his own and other talented Native’s unique silver jewelry and other artwork.  From 1985 to 1989 he headed the local Lone Feather Indian Council in a position that was then called Chief.  For two years, he was the host of the Native American segment of KKTV’s Involvement television series, a weekly program featuring hosts presenting minority topics and interviewees from the Pikes Peak area.  Robert hosted once or twice a month.  

 

 

He played the role of Alessandro in the 1985  historic play production of Helen Hunt Jackson’s book “Ramona” that was performed over several days at the Pioneer Museum.  He has also acted in several movies and authored the best-selling children’s book The Legend of Spinoza.  Along the way, he has several times been asked to help ceremonially welcome emigrants taking the oath of allegiance as new American citizens.

 

 

Robert also learned to play a flute after he fell in love with a beautiful flute that he acquired by trading several valuable pieces of his original jewelry. He now owns close to a hundred flutes and is an accomplished flautist.  He has been nominated for a Native American Music Award for his “Echoes of the Heart – A Sacred Journey” flute music CD.

   

 

Robert’s mother is Naomi End-of-Day Woman, who many of us know.  His great grandmother named him Con-nos-sem-tig, which translates to  “tree growing toward the heavens,” or  Tall Tree.  When he was a young man, he traveled often with his tribal elders, and they taught him as they traveled. 

 

 

Robert is a direct lineal descendent of the Swan Creek band of Saginaw Chippewa.  Terri is not Native by blood but has been adopted into the Chippewa Nation. 

 

 

Terri, for her part, has brought a wide range of CEO and Director of Development experience to their team.  She was once presented the Central Ohio Lung Association’s Humanitarian Award for outstanding contributions in developing programs for children with asthma.  She has been featured in the book Who We Could Be At Work by Margaret Lulic as a role model for corporate leaders interested in incorporating spirit into their work place.  She helped to grow the Spinoza Teddy Bear Company from a home-based business to a company with 32 employees and an international, multi-million dollar business.

 

 

Robert has three children who all live in the Colorado Springs area with their families.  His two daughters have given them seven grandchildren.  His son is not married yet.  Ashley, Alex, Aleyah, Aden and Aizlynn belong to daughter Brandi and carry the names Stargazer, Red Fox, Little Bird, Golden Eagle, and Dreamer (She Has a Vision), respectively.  Autumn and Kaylee belong to daughter Cinamyn and carry the names Strawberry Woman and She Soars Like An Eagle.

 

 

It will be fun watching these third generation TallTree decendents as they grow up in our midst, and their grandparents continue to represent their family and our community in their international travels.  

 

Robert and Terri are taking the summer off this year for the first time, and their plans include going to the reservation in Michigan for their annual homecoming gathering and family ceremonies. Grandmother Naomi will be there, naturally.

 

 

Robert and Terri will be marketing a new teaching kit this fall, “The TallTree Bundle,” and will be very busy getting that ready to go after their summer trip.  Then it will be time to go traveling again with the children’s, business, personal and parenting training classes they offer.  It has been nice to have them in town over this summer of leisure. You can read more and keep up with their adventures on their web site

www.thetalltrees.com/

 

Chief Robert and Terri Lynn TallTree
www.thetalltrees.com

“Teach us love, compassion and honor…that we may heal the Earth, and heal each other.”   – Ojibwe prayer

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

This time of year is very busy for us. We’re on the road doing school programs, and sometimes book signings for Robert’s book “The Legend of Spinoza — The Bear Who Speaks from the Heart.”  The other day we were discussing how important it is to stay in balance. It is crucial, for us, and for everybody who lives in this out-of balance world. Our elders say, “Mind, Body, Spirit.” For if one of these is out of balance, it effects the other two. We stay in balance by:

  • Getting enough sleep
  • Starting every day with gratitude
  • Drinking at least 64 oz. of pure water every day (or more!)
  • Eating whole, natural foods
  • Taking a brisk walk, exercising or doing a little yoga every day
  • Staying in touch with our emotions, and living from our hearts

These are simple things that we can all do, and it helps

Here’s a picture of Robert at a book signing at Prairie Edge in Rapid City, South Dakota:

Read Full Post »

Here’s a picture of us with Terri’s Dad, Chet Blood.

We love you Dad!

Thinking of Dad reminds us of the generations that have gone before us, and how they have done so much to make this world a better place. As Native Americans we have a strong tradition of honoring our elders, as do many other ethnic groups in the United States and throughout the world. It’s so important, now more than ever, to thank our parents and grandparents for the people that we’ve become, and for the sacrifices that they have made. 

May we always walk in a way that makes our ancestors proud and happy.

Read Full Post »

Here’s a bunch of pictures from our September Kansas tour.  We are so blessed to be able to tour schools around the nation.

This Lincoln Elementary School picture is with the principal, his name is Sherman. Nice guy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out the marque at Nelson Elementary! Sweet!

 

The beautiful mural of the sea is inside Nelson, and their mascot is the Sharks.

The Crooked Creek Lodge is in Moline and Barbara, the owner, made us a wonderful homemade breakfast! Her daughter hand painted the artwork on the walls of the Lodge, and it was a wonderful stay!

The last photo is in front of West Elk High School in Howard, KS. We were trying to get the school sign in the background, but didn’t make it:-(

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chief Robert and Terri Lynn TallTree
www.thetalltrees.com

“Teach us love, compassion and honor…that we may heal the Earth, and heal each other.”   – Ojibwe prayer

Read Full Post »

Here are some chicken riders we met when we drove through Oxford, Kansas last week. Chicken riders – now that got our attention!

Speaking of chickens, there are some Native tribes who have Chicken Dances.  Read more about it – or listen to some sound clips:

www.ohwejagehka.com/chickendance.htm

Ohwejagehka: Ha`degaenage: is a nonprofit organization based on Six Nations of the Grand River in Ontario Canada that was established to help preserve and nurture the Iroquoian languages and songs.

Here are some characteristics of the Chicken Dance:

 

  •  Format is the same as with Moccasin Dance, songs are different
  • 2 or more singers, usually about 6-10, in the middle, water drum and horn rattles
  • fish step style
  • Single file, two men lead the dance, other men join in pairs
  • Women join the men, two at a time and join the line between the men so that the line eventually ends up as two men, two women, two men
  • Song changes beat and the men and women switch places, so that the women that started on the inside of two men, end up on the outside of two men
  • The song ends and the partners stay where they are until the next song, and they will switch places again, when the beat changes
  • At the end of the last song, the lead dancer male will crow like a rooster

Gakina-awiiya (We Are All Related),

Chief Robert and Terri Lynn TallTree
www.thetalltrees.com

“Teach us love, compassion and honor…that we may heal the Earth, and heal each other.”   – Ojibwe prayer

Read Full Post »

When we were in Kansas last week we had a little time after one of our school programs, so we were exploring the area and came on the Safari Zoological Park.  We’re not putting any pictures on our blog due to copyright issues, but eventually Tom and Allie, the owners, are going to email us pictures they took of us with their animals, and we’ll share them.  They told us the most amazing story! This park has lions, and tigers, and bears (oh my), and other animals, and have for many years.  This past summer the owners decided to close the park because they were flat broke – ran out of money.  At around the same time their White Bengal Tiger had three cubs (who are so adorable, go to the website to look at pictures).  For some odd reason – and nobody knows why – the tiger mama refused to nurse the cubs.  So what happens?  The owner’s superhero dog steps up to nurse the cubs!  So now the cubs are flourishing due to Isabella, the family dog, and the owners are going on The Today Show, and Oprah because everybody’s so fascinated with the white-tiger-nursing-dog, which will hopefully generate income from donors to keep the park open.  Go look at pictures!  Again, we didn’t take pictures out of respect for copyright issues, but here’s a picture of Terri standing by a tree in the park.

We are humbled by how Nature has a continuous hand in showing us that we can all live together.

Gakina-awiiya (We Are All Related),

Chief Robert and Terri Lynn TallTree
www.thetalltrees.com

“Teach us love, compassion and honor…that we may heal the Earth, and heal each other.”   – Ojibwe prayer

Read Full Post »

How could anyone

Shaina Noll (songwriter: Libby Roderick)

 

Gakina-awiiya (We Are All Related),

Chief Robert and Terri Lynn TallTree
www.thetalltrees.com

“Teach us love, compassion and honor…that we may heal the Earth, and heal each other.”   – Ojibwe prayer

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »